We found the Jura J9 to be intuitive to navigate and the state of the art TFT display which features text and images, combined with the rotary selector makes choosing your beverage simple. A standout feature of this model if the “fine foam” technology which utilizes three bars in the frother spout which acts to slow down the foam as it exits the frother so its poured at the right speed and evenly into the cup. The stainless steel vacuum milk container that feeds the frother warms the milk or cream and is easy to clean. The hardened steel grinding heads of the built-in canonical grinder deliver precision ground coffee every single time. There isn’t a single thing the IMPRESSA J9 doesn’t do well and it probably the most well-rounded model on our list.
Coffee & Espresso Machines - Touch-button convenience, sophisticated styling and customized options like no other. The Jura Capresso Impressa F7 Automatic Coffee Center Espresso Machine creates delicious, perfectly tailored drinks with less preparation time and less noise. The commercial-grade specially angled internal coffee grinder is now twice as fast. With the full programmability of the Jura F-line, the espresso maker customizes your coffee - all with automatic or push-button ease and without even moving the cup. The high performance 18-bar pump with 1,450-watt stainless-steel lined Thermoblock heating system ensures fast, energy efficiency. Espresso maker's 10-digit LED display dialog system shows brew strength and cup size while brewing. DualFrother PLUS smoothly froths and steams milk of the finest quality and consistency. Sleek, symmetrical design fits in any kitchen or office, right under the cabinet. Product Features 18-bar pump with 1450-watt stainless-steel lined Thermoblock heating system for fast, - Specifications Made in Switzerland Material: ABS, polypropylene, stainless-steel, matte chrome plating Model: 13709 Capacity: 64 oz. Watts: 1700 / 110 Volts Size: 11" W x 17.5 D x 14" H Weight: 25 lb. Use and Care Housing wipes clean with damp cloth. Rinse and refill water tank daily. see more...
You also get programmable push-button controls for milk, hot water and espresso outputs and given the fact that the 1003380 Accademia dispenses great beverages on demand, it’s great for those who don’t like to wait for long before their drink is ready. In total, there are 7 buttons that you can use in order to prepare one of the following drinks hot water, latte macchiato, latte, cappuccino, cafe lungo, cafe and of course, espresso.
Have used a SAECO machine for the last ten years.Finally "blew up" and I needed a replacement. Have known the Jura machines for a long time but because of the price never considered purchasing one. Finally had the courage to purchase the Jura J9 and have absolutely no regrets. Makes excellent Espresso or a coffee with a crema. Cappuccinos or Latte Macchiatos are a breeze to make. Wish I would have purchased earlier.
So, given all the above information, we reckon that Jura is the brand of choice where cost is not a significant consideration. The Impressa is a brilliant choice for those bean-heads who crave multiple cups of excellent coffee or who like to entertain. Alternatively, the compact Ena 1 is perfect for those with limited storage space and has the advantage of a top-quality, integral grinder.
If you’re a froth fan, you won’t be disappointed – Jura machines tend to be very good frothers (if that’s a word) and manage to top off drinks to the same standard as you’ll usually find in the high street coffee shops. It’s certainly an impressive result, even if we found it was a novelty the wore off rather quickly. We’re not the biggest advocates of milk foaming though, so you might be more excited that we are!
I only have one minor quibble with this machine; if you like cappuccino, it produces foam that is weak and deflates easily. I have troubleshot this problem from every possible angle (tried different percent milkfat, different milks(soy), different milk temps etc.) and the results were still a little disappointing. I purchased the Milk Frothing accessory designed for this unit and still could not produce the more velvety foam I was seeking. The easiest fix for this is to buy an Aerolatte: steam your milk with the F9 (the steam function works great) and then whip till your hearts content with the Aerolatte. For an extra $15 bucks spent on the Aerolatte, you'll have the perfect cup of cappuccino to rival any cafe.
In addition, the Capresso website offers plenty of data for using this espresso machine. Among other things, it provides a downloadable user manual along with PDF files containing a variety of delicious hot milk frothing recipes so you can prepare such things as different types of teas, soothing milk drinks and several different types of hot chocolate drinks.
Even better, you won’t have to worry about stale water ever again and that’s because the ThermoBlock technology is going to channel the right amount of water required by the specific drink you’re preparing. On top of that, you also don’t need to worry about experiencing any metallic taste in your coffee and that’s thanks to the machine’s stainless steel lining.
“My wife and I love this espresso maker. It makes a wonderful and hot espresso, cappuccino and coffee. It is easy to use as well as maintain daily and seems fairly foolproof for me. Love that Jura has added so many automated reminders and safety features to keep it easily running in tip-top shape. My only knock on it is that the milk frother does not get the milk foam quite hot enough. Drinks requiring a bit more milk (e.g., latte macchiato) tend to cool the overall drink down a bit too much for our tastes.” - Edmond, Amazon User
One downside of the C65 is that it isn’t self-cleaning. If you don’t mind taking it apart and rinsing everything out manually, then that shouldn’t be an issue. However, as James mentioned, sometimes the bean holder will think that it’s empty when there are still grounds inside. Overall, it is a minor inconvenience, but it can be frustrating when you’re running late in the morning, and you get a smaller cup as a result.
The new Gaggia Brera is a very impressive super automatic espresso machine that has a small form factor, making it perfect for use on small kitchen countertops. Not only that, but it seems that the company has focused, among other things, to ensure that the Brera fully maximizes user convenience. For instance, the water tank, drop tray and the dregs drawer are all within reach and can be easily accessed from the machine for simple, swift maintenance and regular cleaning. With this model, beverage selection and machine programming has been greatly simplified, allowing users to easily navigate through the options which are certainly more than you’d expect from such a small machine.
You don’t really need to be a coffee connoisseur to be able to prepare your own drinks with this coffee machine. There are recipes for 12 coffee creations which you can select with the rotary switch. The machine uses images and texts to guide users through the preparation stages. You can prepare coffee choices such as Irish coffee, flavored latte macchiato, Viennese coffee, and Café Melange, amongst others. In addition, this coffee machine is also self cleaning to eliminate any excuses when it comes to making speciality coffee at home.
I also hate my Jura-Capresso coffee machines. Not only do they cost a wad of money, the insides cannot be end-user cleaned or serviced. The O rings in the brew mechanism go out after a few years and bring everything to a noisy grinding halt. Plus, the machine makes almost-hot enough coffee... 15 seconds in the microwave and it's hot, but sometimes makes the coffee bitter. I deduct one star for these gripes and now we're at three stars.
It had to happen sooner or later. Some company had to take the next step forward in engineering the future of espresso machines—Jura has certainly thrown the gauntlet down with their Impressa Z9. This is the highlight of Swiss engineering, taking a classic Italian concept, strapping it to a time machine and blasting it into the future. The main ingredient for tech junkies here is the full-color Thin-Film-Transistor display screen, otherwise known as the TFT.
Not trouble free, as they all seem to jam periodically, but easily fixed. Per J-C, the problem is using very oily beans, which we do as we love very dark, heavily roasted Starbucks beans. The part that jams is the press mechanism. When it expresses the puck, it clogs and won't go back up. This seems to be a criticism for many of its machines, but it's hardly a deal breaker.
This machine can invade your dreams with all its capabilities. One of the coolest is its ability to automatically fully clean itself but don’t forget about the straight forward programming, which is so simple the only time you’ll need the manual is to figure out what buttons to hold down. Last but not lease, the capabilities of customizing your drink is even above the ESAM3500, which is impressive
Before we get into the technical aspects of the two types of espresso machines, here’s what you really need to know. Semi-automatic espresso machines are going to be perfect for the espresso connoisseur. If you’re the type that really wants to get the best-quality and taste out of your espresso machine and don’t mind taking a little more time and effort out of your schedule, the semi-automatic espresso maker is going to be for you. It’s a little bit more work, but the key here is that you ultimately have more control over every subtle nuance that goes into your version of the perfect shot of espresso with a semi-automatic.
So, given all the above information, we reckon that Jura is the brand of choice where cost is not a significant consideration. The Impressa is a brilliant choice for those bean-heads who crave multiple cups of excellent coffee or who like to entertain. Alternatively, the compact Ena 1 is perfect for those with limited storage space and has the advantage of a top-quality, integral grinder.
Jura does not make any budget-friendly machines, so you should come in expecting to make an investment. Prices range from $800 for a single cup machine, to above $5,000 for Jura’s top of the line model. You can always search for refurbished models, and Jura occasionally offers factory serviced machines that function like new, but have been returned to the company for unspecified reasons.
Jura offers the ultimate in luxury coffee machines. Designed for those with discerning tastes, this well-known brand offers some of the best coffee makers you can buy – period. From single-serve machines to top-of-the-line super automatic espresso makers, Jura does it all. For the home-brewing enthusiasts, the following three models are the best-of-the-best.
When looking for a fully automatic espresso machine, you have the choice to go for either a dual heating system or a single heating system machine. For instance, if you go for a dual boiler machine, then when you’re going to start the steam model, you’ll need to wait for about ten seconds until steam is available. With a single element system, the wait time increases by a factor of 5 and it takes about fifty seconds to get steam.
The one-touch approach extends far beyond simply grinding your coffee. Anything that you do with the Jura is going to be accomplished with that original a single button. This is a welcomed departure from other more advanced coffee systems which claim to be one-touch, but require you to do a lot of additional work when making more complicated drinks.

The Good: The Jura Giga 5 Automatic Coffee Center is a top of the line espresso machine. It includes easy to operate controls and interactive menus. With the Jura Giga 5, you have 19 individually programmable specialty coffees to choose from. One of the biggest advantages of this fine machine is the separate grinders and brewing chambers, for making 2 separate types of coffee at the same time.
This super-automatic Jura Capresso ENA 5 coffee machine does produce a tasty cup of coffee, no doubt about it. But we are concerned about its ability to hold up under pressure (literally, with flying milk nozzles!). For the kind of cash that this machine requires, most customers would likely be happier with another Jura model (the S9, perhaps) or another brand of super-automatic coffee machine.
Some machines can be quite slow to work their way through programmes, but Jura have put a lot of thought into minimising these delays. The water heating tends to be the cause of the waits, so the F8’s solution is to heat it as it passes through the internal pipes of the machine. The technical detail is a bit beyond us, but it seems to work well. If you want to know more and like the geeky detail, give ‘Jura Thermoblock’ a Google!
The Jura-Capresso S8 is a luxurious coffee and espresso machine with a long list of benefits and only a few detractors. The price would be the biggest obstacle for most consumers, and while those with pure coffee tastes may demure at the price tag, coffee connoisseurs who patronize the typical overpriced chain coffee shops could justify the expense. The bottom line is that one cannot fail to make perfect cafe-style drinks with the sexy, state-of-the-art S8 machine.
It’s affordable (£70 at Argos at the time of writing; Dolce Gusto pods are priced at around £4 for a box of 16) and incredibly simple to set up and use. Simply fill the removable water tank with cold H2O, pop your chosen coffee pod into a slide-out drawer at the front, stick a cup under the spout and hit the power button. When it turns from red to green (a mere few seconds) the machine is ready. You then push the water lever either left (for cold drinks) or right (for hot drinks) until the desired amount of your drink is in the cup. Then slide out the drawer, expel the pod and throw it away.
If you are going to try to make other coffees with this machine, plan on doing some trial runs to get it right. Since you can adjust the amount of water and beans, you can make standard coffee if you want, but it’s not going to be as good as the espresso. Overall, we only recommend this to espresso drinkers, but it’s nice to know that you can make other beverages if and when you want a change.
As a home barista, you need to master all the above techniques to get the right espresso. If you make a little mistake you compromise your shot. As a result, you’ll get an average shot. Even if you know what it takes to get your shot right, there is very little room for error. Failed shots are pretty common with beginner baristas. You probably noticed in coffee shops that the shot differs from barista to barista.
Yep, the Barista Express isn’t just an elegant, well-built espresso machine – it also features a built-in grinder, allowing you to make coffee with beans you’ve smashed into dust literally seconds earlier. Freshness means a lot in the coffee world, so this is a Big Deal – as is the low-pressure pre-infusion of the grounds before the water is forced through them at higher 50 bar pressure.
For those really into their coffee drinks, and I mean obsessively so, a separate grinder is an absolute must. That loud noise you hear in the coffee shop every time you go in? That’s the grinder. Now, after saying that, let me tell you the grinder in the F7 is quiet and fast. So don’t worry about your kitchen ending up sounding like a coffee shop’s barista station.
The machine is very nice looking in person, very sleek. The instruction manual is pretty sparse on details. It has enough, but it's a little intimidating for a first time user. I took my time and found out that the programming is very user friendly and easy to use. I have ours on our counter with a cabinet overhead. When I fill water reservoir I do pull the machine a bit forward because the reservoir is deep and you have to lift it straight up. It's easy to do but you need a bit of clearance. The bean hopper is in the back, so I pull the machine forward a bit to fill that, as well. Very easy to do. One thing I wanted in the J9 was the option to use a water filter. I have hard water from our tap, and had been filling our DeLonghi from our filtered refrigerator dispenser, but that was cumbersome. With the Jura filter I can fill the deep reservoir right in the little bar sink I have next to the machine. I tested the water before and after, and the Jura filter definitely works to reduce hardness, which is important in keeping the machine free from mineral scale buildup. I think it will be well worth the expense of replacing the filters. It came with one filter and a couple of descaling tabs, which I have not had to use yet.
I also hate my Jura-Capresso coffee machines. Not only do they cost a wad of money, the insides cannot be end-user cleaned or serviced. The O rings in the brew mechanism go out after a few years and bring everything to a noisy grinding halt. Plus, the machine makes almost-hot enough coffee... 15 seconds in the microwave and it's hot, but sometimes makes the coffee bitter. I deduct one star for these gripes and now we're at three stars.
To make it easy for you, we’ve gathered up the best espresso machines on the market, carefully weighed, and prioritized several criteria in testing and put together these targeted espresso machine reviews that are specifically meant to help you cut through all the confusion and just get the best deal on the home espresso maker that fits your style.
The other reviews comment on the burr grinder sticking and this may be as a result of using oily beans. This problem is addressed in the manual; they offer recommendations on how to get the oils to evaporate somewhat to prevent issues with the machine. The beans I use are not particularly oily and I have never had a problem with the grinder nor any problems with any of the other functions with this machine. This unit has already paid for itself several times over in savings over what I would pay at any coffee house; very pleased with this purchase!
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