Jura bean to cup coffee machines form a premium range that will appeal to readers with a higher budget level. With some machines moving up into the four figure range, they offer a high quality coffee to match that higher price tag. Many coffee lovers swear by the brand, as you would expect from a company that focuses on delivering high quality products.
It’s highly efficient, meaning that you don’t get as much ground residue after processing your beans. Not only does this ensure that your coffee tastes (and smells) better, but it saves on the cleaning process. Finally, the E6 has a separate milk frother and spout. Instead of pouring milk through one of the nozzles that can be used for coffee (this model also can make two cups simultaneously), the E6 keeps it all separated.
Setup is way easier than the manual would have you believe - the pathetic printed booklet is by far the weakest link in this coffee production line. Fitting the water filter and the Smart Connect dongle is not explained well at all. You’ll find answers to most of your questions online - but probably not on JURA’s website. Unofficial YouTube videos proved much more useful.
The 1150W DeLonghi ESAM3500.N is capable of preparing a wide range of coffee drinks, including lattes, cappuccinos, coffee, espresso and more. You can easily brew directly into the twelve oz cups, demitasse or espresso thanks to the height adjustable coffee spouts this model comes with. Thanks to the instant reheat function, keeping the ESAM3500.N at the right temperature is a breeze, regardless of the length of time between cups.
This machine can invade your dreams with all its capabilities. One of the coolest is its ability to automatically fully clean itself but don’t forget about the straight forward programming, which is so simple the only time you’ll need the manual is to figure out what buttons to hold down. Last but not lease, the capabilities of customizing your drink is even above the ESAM3500, which is impressive
You don’t even have to deal with the coffee grounds right away: they just drop into a little box that needs periodic emptying. Like the the 1.4l water tank, this box slides out of the front of the machine, which means you don’t need to fumble around at the back or move it away from the wall every few cups of coffee you make. It’s a nice touch, especially as the water tank in particular requires regular topping up: every time you switch the machine on, it flushes water through its pipes to keep them clean. It’s a bit of a faff, but it has its benefits: the NC-ZA1 makes a surprisingly delicious cup of coffee.
The new Gaggia Brera is a very impressive super automatic espresso machine that has a small form factor, making it perfect for use on small kitchen countertops. Not only that, but it seems that the company has focused, among other things, to ensure that the Brera fully maximizes user convenience. For instance, the water tank, drop tray and the dregs drawer are all within reach and can be easily accessed from the machine for simple, swift maintenance and regular cleaning. With this model, beverage selection and machine programming has been greatly simplified, allowing users to easily navigate through the options which are certainly more than you’d expect from such a small machine.
Not trouble free, as they all seem to jam periodically, but easily fixed. Per J-C, the problem is using very oily beans, which we do as we love very dark, heavily roasted Starbucks beans. The part that jams is the press mechanism. When it expresses the puck, it clogs and won't go back up. This seems to be a criticism for many of its machines, but it's hardly a deal breaker.

I also hate my Jura-Capresso coffee machines. Not only do they cost a wad of money, the insides cannot be end-user cleaned or serviced. The O rings in the brew mechanism go out after a few years and bring everything to a noisy grinding halt. Plus, the machine makes almost-hot enough coffee... 15 seconds in the microwave and it's hot, but sometimes makes the coffee bitter. I deduct one star for these gripes and now we're at three stars.
The machine is very nice looking in person, very sleek. The instruction manual is pretty sparse on details. It has enough, but it's a little intimidating for a first time user. I took my time and found out that the programming is very user friendly and easy to use. I have ours on our counter with a cabinet overhead. When I fill water reservoir I do pull the machine a bit forward because the reservoir is deep and you have to lift it straight up. It's easy to do but you need a bit of clearance. The bean hopper is in the back, so I pull the machine forward a bit to fill that, as well. Very easy to do. One thing I wanted in the J9 was the option to use a water filter. I have hard water from our tap, and had been filling our DeLonghi from our filtered refrigerator dispenser, but that was cumbersome. With the Jura filter I can fill the deep reservoir right in the little bar sink I have next to the machine. I tested the water before and after, and the Jura filter definitely works to reduce hardness, which is important in keeping the machine free from mineral scale buildup. I think it will be well worth the expense of replacing the filters. It came with one filter and a couple of descaling tabs, which I have not had to use yet.
Before we get into the technical aspects of the two types of espresso machines, here’s what you really need to know. Semi-automatic espresso machines are going to be perfect for the espresso connoisseur. If you’re the type that really wants to get the best-quality and taste out of your espresso machine and don’t mind taking a little more time and effort out of your schedule, the semi-automatic espresso maker is going to be for you. It’s a little bit more work, but the key here is that you ultimately have more control over every subtle nuance that goes into your version of the perfect shot of espresso with a semi-automatic.

It had to happen sooner or later. Some company had to take the next step forward in engineering the future of espresso machines—Jura has certainly thrown the gauntlet down with their Impressa Z9. This is the highlight of Swiss engineering, taking a classic Italian concept, strapping it to a time machine and blasting it into the future. The main ingredient for tech junkies here is the full-color Thin-Film-Transistor display screen, otherwise known as the TFT.
Yep, the Barista Express isn’t just an elegant, well-built espresso machine – it also features a built-in grinder, allowing you to make coffee with beans you’ve smashed into dust literally seconds earlier. Freshness means a lot in the coffee world, so this is a Big Deal – as is the low-pressure pre-infusion of the grounds before the water is forced through them at higher 50 bar pressure.
This machine can invade your dreams with all its capabilities. One of the coolest is its ability to automatically fully clean itself but don’t forget about the straight forward programming, which is so simple the only time you’ll need the manual is to figure out what buttons to hold down. Last but not lease, the capabilities of customizing your drink is even above the ESAM3500, which is impressive
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